Dr Daniela Sanchez-Lopez

Phd, MA, BSc

Margaret Anstee Research Fellow

College Jobs

  • Margaret Anstee Research Fellow
  • Fellow B

Contact

Email: mds88@cam.ac.uk

Biography

Dr Daniela Sanchez-Lopez works on the geopolitics of renewable energies, with a particular focus on lithium extraction in South America.

Dr Daniela Sanchez-Lopez was born and raised in La Paz, Bolivia. She has a BA in Economic Sciences from the Universidad Católica Boliviana, an MA in Development Studies from the Institute of Social Studies (ISS) of Erasmus University Rotterdam in the Netherlands and a Ph.D. in International Development from the University of East Anglia, UK.

She has a decade of experience in public policy research in international organizations including the United Nations Development Program (UNDP-Bolivia), Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF) and NGOs with a regional expertise in Latin America.

She has received a number of different awards and scholarships, which have enabled her research to date. In 2007, she won a highly competitive Latin-American research grant from the Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF). Her PhD project was financed by a Faculty studentship at University of East Anglia and two grants from the Royal Geographical Society, and the UK Society for Latin American Studies.

She is an honorary member of the Anglo-Bolivian Society and a country representative at the Latin-American Geographies-UK.

Research Interests

Dr Daniel Sanchez-Lopez is a research fellow at the Margaret Anstee Centre for Global Studies at Newnham College, having joined in October 2018. She says, “On a personal level, being part of a college with an inspiring legacy for women’s empowerment is a real honour.”

Her research focuses on the geopolitics of renewable energies and lithium in the South American salt flats of Bolivia, Argentina and Chile.

Her current research agenda explores the factors shaping the governance of lithium in the Andean region, the role of China in accessing the lithium supply chain, and the new forms of dependency and neo-colonialism emerging globally, in response to the transition to low-carbon energy and the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals.